independent games festival

Games That Provoke — Will You Ever Return: In da Hood

by Jed Pressgrove

Our responses to video game content seem to be predestined. We can reasonably predict how we will feel about a game’s violence, a game’s lack of diversity, a game’s language, a game’s sex, a game’s political meaning. The unexpected boldness of Will You Ever Return: In da Hood could temporarily halt this pattern — if only it could get more attention.

Some would find it very easy to dismiss Will You Ever Return: In da Hood immediately. The game opens with Satan proclaiming “I like to fuck bunnies” and shooting his spermatozoa. Unlike with a Grand Theft Auto or South Park entry, you really don’t know what you’re getting with Will You Ever Return: In da Hood, even if you’ve played the first two Will You Ever Return games from developer Jack King-Spooner.

Uninterested in building a franchise, Will You Ever Return: In da Hood plays with our perceptions of reality. As Will Smith from his Fresh Prince days, you search a dreary part of Philadelphia and interact with pop culture icons, the majority of whom are rappers. Although you control a Will Smith made of pixels, many icons in the game resemble their real-life counterparts, like pictures cut out of magazines. This visual approach reveals a pretense in how big-budget graphics are often praised — video game “realism” is only polygon deep. (An acknowledgement of artificiality is also why the Scottish King-Spooner can have an American rapper say “mum.”)

The quests in Will You Ever Return: In da Hood also call attention to the commingling of reality and artifice and how we perceive both as an audience (as Tupac says, “Reality is wrong. Dreams are for real.”). The first significant interaction is with Jennifer Lopez, who tells you she needs crack — a silly fabrication that nonetheless awakens the social judgment that tabloid journalism has taught us. You eventually get caught up in the “war” between Biggie and Tupac, which culminates in a joke straight out of Looney Tunes. Another scenario involves talking with the Wu-Tang Clan about rules of the street. Then there’s a staring contest against Hulk Hogan. This type of satire doesn’t debase pop mythology; it amplifies our understanding of it.

The ridiculous quests are juxtaposed against more pressing social problems. King-Spooner’s gun-control agenda lacks insight, but the game’s attention to poverty and street violence creates a need for catharsis (i.e., the need for Big Willie Style). The historical racial divide highlighted in NPC dialogue (“Emmitt Till to Trayvon Martin.”) goes beyond the debates in the video game community. One can learn more about race from the references in Will You Ever Return: In da Hood than from the self-important public relations about diversity and social injustice at the Game Developers Conference.

Perhaps it’s not ironic that King-Spooner uses Will Smith to reconcile reality and artifice. The developer’s critique of Lil Wayne might seem mean-spirited, but there’s a lot of truth to the resolution: “Will [Smith] raps and the world becomes a better place. Children stop to listen and flowers bloom.” It certainly sounds more credible than the Independent Games Festival telling us that the miserable Papers, Please was the greatest thing of 2013.

Dominique Pamplemousse Throws a Pity Party

by Jed Pressgrove

Dominique Pamplemousse in “It’s All Over Once the Fat Lady Sings!” encourages political correctness from those in the know, not empathy and understanding. As the Independent Games Festival awards get closer, game critics make sure that nominees like Dominique Pamplemousse receive enough hype not only to legitimize the IGF competition but also to trumpet their sensitivity to genderqueer folk. Meanwhile, the ignorant remain ignorant and perhaps even indignant.

Developer Deidra Kiai should be commended for the work and risks involved in the creation of a point-and-click musical. Almost everything, including the claymation and singing, was done by Kiai, though the game’s presentation sometimes suffers from a lack of comedic timing. Dominique Pamplemousse also admirably forgoes the process featured in adventures like The Shivah. For example, you instantly move from location to location, so there’s no silly map to speak of.

The game’s cynicism, however, nearly eliminates its technical and creative charm. The pretense of being “about gender and the economy” is suited for headlines rather than gamer consensus. The first mistake is making genderqueerness a bad punchline. As a protagonist, Dominique Pamplemousse doesn’t reveal anything insightful about gender; the character is merely an annoyed victim whose complaints fail to articulate what the choir (self-congratulatory critics) already knows. To some people who don’t mind the choice of a men’s or women’s restroom, Dominique might come across as a weird joke. One could attack people for this perspective, but the game fulfills dismissive attitudes on both sides as opposed to shedding light on the limitations of binary thinking about gender.

Domininque Pamplemousse also wants pity for the struggling working class, but its cynical approach lacks perspective. Economic deprivation is portrayed as a given, not a result of complex environmental and social factors. The story implies that the protagonist could have been economically secure if a college idea hadn’t been stolen, but the game’s usage of Auto-Tune singing is depressingly pathetic, whether as a joke, plot device, or commentary on identity. The game’s two endings deliver the ultimate bleak message that morality and happiness are impossible to maintain in tough times — just more sentimentality for a spoiled American society that confuses the Great Recession with the Great Depression.

While Dominique Pamplemousse has its endearing moments (such as the bagpipes joke and the ending credits sequence), all of its cynicism adds up to a plea for pity, a surefire way to kill laughter and prevent catharsis. The game lacks the hope and dreams of Grand Titons and keeps many in the dark about social realities that aren’t going to be obvious to everyone.