m. bison

Loaded Questions Vol. 5

Loaded Questions is a new weekly feature at Game Bias. If you have a question you would like to submit, please email it to pressgrove84@yahoo.com or tweet it to @jedpressfate. Questions can cover anything closely or tangentially related to video games or art, including but not limited to criticism, culture, and politics. Questions may be edited for clarity.

Dalton Miller: It seems like Eastern influence is once again dominating the space of major publisher games at large (see The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Nier: Automata, the Dark Souls series, the newfound popularity of the Yakuza series in the West, etc.). Do you agree? If so, do you think this will be a lasting influence, or will the Gears of War-style Western games space return eventually?

Jed Pressgrove: I don’t know if I would say Eastern influence is dominating the market. If we look at the top 10 best-selling games of 2017 in the United States, there’s more Western influence represented in that list, and guess which 2013 Western game made the list? Grand Theft Auto V.

But I would agree there is a shift of a sort. People do seem to be far more interested in Japanese games than they were a few years ago. The Nintendo Switch’s popularity is a clear indicator of that. We can also see this shift in the rapid emergence of games like PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, which was directly inspired by the Japanese film Battle Royale.

Also, if we’re talking about countries within the Eastern hemisphere, you would have to cite games like The Witcher III. So the influence goes beyond Japan.

It really doesn’t matter to me if this influence is lasting. I’m more interested in what games are doing and saying. It’s also hard for me to predict what the public will gravitate toward. For one thing, my standards often don’t align with the standards of the public. And in the next five years, there could be some cultural or political event that somehow inspires a lot of people to start playing certain games.

Ryan Aston: What is the best video-game boss? What is your philosophy for bosses in general? Do you think they should test how proficient you’ve become with skills learned across the game, introduce new mechanics, or what?

Jed Pressgrove: M. Bison. Beyond his devastating standing kicks and strong horizontal/vertical game, M. Bison embodies everything that’s wrong in Street Fighter II. Think about how important geography is in Street Fighter II. You don’t just pick a fighter. You pick a country to represent, and you fight the champions of other countries. You watch a plane fly around the world. Every character is represented by a specific stage. But you don’t know where Bison comes from. All you know is that you fight him in Thailand, on the same stage that you fight the Thai fighter Sagat, because that’s where Bison is headquartered. He is completely divorced from ethnicity, home, and background, and that, not his brutality, is what makes him more inhuman than anyone else in the game.

My only philosophy on bosses is that they should make for interesting conflicts, which can involve testing what a player has learned, throwing mechanical curveballs, and so much more. In Blazing Lazers, the first boss can be “defeated” without shooting a single bullet. This particular boss can split itself into three different parts, forcing the player to move to different safe spaces. The boss is a cinch to defeat if you are powered up, but if you keep dodging its different parts — as if you and the boss are part of some synchronized dance — the boss will eventually leave, and you get to move on to the second stage.

Jeff Hudspeth: Are there genres you struggle to engage with, and how do you approach them critically? I’m thinking here of my own difficulty getting into real-time strategy games and how game genres seem to contrast with each other more starkly than, say, movie genres.

Jed Pressgrove: There are a few genres I don’t engage with, and I typically don’t or won’t review them because of a lack of interest and/or experience.

Although I am very familiar with a variety of role-playing games, I stay away from massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs), primarily because of the money and/or time that they often demand. I’m not interested in being part of a 30-member party and chatting with people before a raid. I have no desire to play a game that controls so many aspects of one’s life.

Sports simulations are another breed that I try to avoid. I love sports (particularly basketball, football, boxing, and mixed martial arts), and sports games can be brilliant (from Blades of Steel to Pyre), but games that attempt to resemble a real sport tend to be uncreative, and they’re pretty much bound to fail. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve played a Madden game, only to marvel at how goofy it is despite a pretense of realism.

The truth is that no game critic can be dedicated to every single genre out there. It takes too much time to play games, and they’re being pumped out at an alarmingly fast rate.

Having said that, I try to cover as many genres as possible. When it comes to fighting games, turn-based strategy, real-time strategy, RPGs, shooters, platformers, adventures, puzzlers, and others, I feel comfortable dissecting them because of my prolonged engagement with them.

Brian: Why do a lot of the arguments in your reviews always amount to a game being either “sexist,” “pandering,” “misogynistic,” or some other overused mainstream word? I’m genuinely curious. Personally, I think games are an art form and should be given the same freedoms as any other art form. Artistic freedom is what makes movies, books, and drawings so interesting to watch, read, and look at. I would write more, but I don’t want to waste your time. Thank you for writing back if you do.

Jed Pressgrove: If the word fits my purposes, I’ll use it. Doesn’t matter to me whether the word is mainstream. I use words that reveal my feelings, thoughts, and personality. I will say, though, that it’s interesting you bring up the terms “sexist” and “misogynistic,” as I don’t use those descriptors that often. In fact, I don’t believe I’ve used those words in any of my reviews this year for Game Bias, Slant, or Unwinnable.

On your point about games as an art form, I agree artists should have the freedom to express themselves. I also believe criticism itself is an art form, so I should have the same freedom as developers. Nothing I do or say should prevent developers from expressing themselves, and vice versa. I have no interest in “changing” games (and I hope developers have no interest in “changing” criticism) — that’s a pointless dream, as no one can control art, and art will never satisfy us. But I will say what I want, and I hope others do the same.

Ian Mossner: What are your thoughts on the criticism of games that don’t have “true” gameplay? I’ve seen multiple tweets like this recently taking aim at Detroit: Become Human.

Jed Pressgrove: There is no such thing as “true gameplay.” People who say otherwise are behind the times. Games have changed, and there’s nothing anyone can do to stop that. That’s why I judge games for what they are. I may not end up liking a game that goes in a different direction than the norm, but it’s important for me to experience the game so that I can be informed on a basic level.

One more thing to consider: games directed by David Cage often get judged before anyone plays them. Detroit: Become Human is only the latest example.

Many commentators think they’re cute and smart when they dismiss upcoming games based on preview material like interviews. When people judge games before they come out for whatever reason, they are being fundamentally close-minded, not to mention unoriginal. In an answer above, I admitted that I don’t engage with sports simulations or MMORPGs. Imagine how ignorant I would be if every time a new MMORPG is announced, I started lambasting it based on preview materials and assumptions. A lot of people love speaking from a standpoint of ignorance, especially on Twitter. It’s easy attention and work. Anybody can highlight a couple of sentences from preview materials and go to town as their buddies cheer them on. If the frequent disparity between artistic intent and execution can’t convince these uninspired analysts that it’s mindless and meaningless to judge things they’ve never experienced, I don’t know what will.

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